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An attractive lacewing with orange head and black eyes belonging to the Osmylid lacewings, this subfamily has only one species. They are carnivorous feeding upon caterpillars and aphids.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans. Further reference available at http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/none/strigatus.html

Locally nomadic, large ground foraging pigeon photographed in the Conservation Area.

Sportsman Creek Conservation Area is happy to announce an application for a Conservation Partners Grant with the Biodiversity Conservation Trust has been approved within a three year term of operation. This grant will support the continued restoration of our riparian zone along and near Sportsman’s Creek and to increase the overall protection of significant old growth trees within the target area. The work area has been identified as having one of the highest stocking rates for arboreal mammals in the Clarence Valley. Continuing weed eradication programmes are underway and one hectare of previously cleared pasture is being prepared for plant-out with native species in early September 2019.

Slashing rampant Blady grass for site preparation

Available online at Blurb.com http://au.blurb.com/b/9005026-the-rustic-furniture-maker-two-contemporary-hand-w

Another journey into sustainable living with the Sportsman Creek Conservation Area Education programme. Hand-whittled contemporary interior designs using found woods from our forest. To obtain your instant PDF copy follow the link above.

Sportsman Creek Press 2019.

http://au.blurb.com/b/9349050-fibre-forage-cordage-weave

New specialist publication by Sportsman Creek Conservation Area Environmental Education programme. A journey of creative discovery sourcing local fibre plants to create functional and beautiful objects. We are proud to offer copies of this book online and available at Blurb.com for a reasonable price in either soft or hardcover and instant PDF format. Just follow the link above to obtain your copy. Sportsman Creek Press 2019

Freshly constructed arboreal Glider nest in a young Spotted Gum tree found in the Wildlife Refuge by visiting Wildlife Photographer Tony Belton.

Soft twig rush or Buckie rush

Sportsman Creek Conservation Area is engaged in growing and planting this native twig rush. Commonly called Buckie rush and used extensively by the Indigenous Bundjalung peoples for basket weaving and net string bag making. A compact slender native bog grass, thrives in standing water and around flooded soils, making it the ultimate landscape plant for wet areas in the garden or for landscape re-vegetation.  

Description – Hardy native grass with
slender attractive lime green foliage and reddish-brown flower spikes.

Location – Will grow in up to 25cm of
water, in full sun or part shade. Hardy tolerating frost and low nutrient
soils.

Uses – Oxygenates and removes nutrients
from pond water and provides habitat keeping ponds cleaner and healthy. THE
STEMS ARE ALSO USED AS EXCELLENT FIBRE FOR BASKET WEAVING.

Care – Low maintenance, trim by half every
two to three years and water if the bog begins to dry out. For weaving harvest
by gently pulling out individual stems.

A tiny owl like bird with huge forward facing eyes used for night hunting flying insects. Found along the riparian zone on Sportsman Creek Conservation Area. Widespread across Australia.

Image courtesy of visiting wildlife photographer Rachel Hebbard.

The Endangered Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby and Joey photographed at Dangar Gorge. 

Where do they live?

In the past, the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby was abundant and widespread across the rocky country of south eastern Australia from southern Queensland to Victoria, roughly following the Great Dividing Range. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was considered a pest and shot for bounties and hunted for their fur. Around half a million Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies were killed during this time. 

Beautiful Sugar Glider found on Red Ironbark tree in the Wildlife Refuge.

An exploration into...
By Jeff Keyes

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