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Lepidopteron

The order of insects with 4 scale covered wings found across Sportsman Creek Conservation Area

Image of male moth with brown patterned forewings, each with a complex spot near the middle. The female is flightless and her bulbous brown body is covered in pale brown hair.

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/lyma/australis.html

I.D. and further reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans

  

Male Orchard or Citrus Butterfly which usually feed on RUTACEAE family of plants. The caterpillars undergo four instar stages before entering pupa stage. The pupa resembles a leaf and metamorphosis can take up to six months.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further Reference: http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/papi/aegeus.html

 

 

Image taken by visiting Wildlife Photographer Tony Belton in the riparan zone at Sportsman Creek of a perfectly camouflaged Evening Brown Butterfly.

Evening Brown Butterfly

The newly published book “Bush Companion Fauna Species of the Clarence Valley and Northern Rivers, New South Wales” is available to purchase direct from the publisher.

This book contains over 310 “full colour plate” fauna species in 250 “perfect bound” pages with both common and scientific names.

Order by email at urimbirra7@gmail.com to reserve your copy.

Price $25 a copy plus postage from Sportsman Creek Press.

Bush Companion Cover

This year we witnessed these beautiful Blue Tiger Butterfly for the first time flying fast in great numbers to the south/west. Apparently they migrate from as far away as North Queensland and we watched their progress from the coast right up into the mountains of Tenterfield so altitudes over twelve hundred metres was not a limiting factor to this migration.

Image courtesy of  Dr. Greg Clancy. 

Blue Tiger Butterlfy Hickey Island Yamba Greg Clancy

“The normal resting posture has the hind wings covered. They are revealed if the moth is disturbed as it opens its wings for flight. The moths have a wingspan of up to 7cm. The body is brown and cigar shaped. The forewings are brown and the hindwings are red edged and black.” Found across the entire continent.

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reading; http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/sphi/scrofa.html

Hippotion scrofa Moth

 

 

 

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/anth/flaves.html”First described by Walker in 1855 . This species of moth feeds on Acacia and pupates in a cocoon under bark or in a crevice. The males and females are very different. The female is larger with dark grey and white wings and an abdomen striped in grey or white. The male has a wingspan of up to 3cm and has orange and cream wings. Found along the east coast of Australia and Tasmania.”   With no common name.

I.D. and further reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans. Mike and Pat Coupar and Stella Crossley.

“Found over much of Australia. Basically green with a lacy white pattern. the adults may be distinguished from those of some species in this genus as the hindwings have a plain curved edge with no scalloping. The caterpillars have spiky extensions to it’s body and looks as if it is clothed in armour.” With no common name and a new species for the Conservation Area. I.D. and reference  courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.  http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/geom/insper.html  

“Adult moth has brown forewings with a dark green sheen, and with a sharply defined broad white border along the edges of the wings. The hindwings are orange, with a black border and black comma in the middle. The moth has a wingspan of about 8cm.” A new sighting for the Conservation Area with the common name Green Fruit-piercing Moth.

I.D. and text reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference – http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/cato/salamin.html

“The adults have a wingspan around 7cm. It is famous for its shiny metallic pupa and beautiful caterpillar with eight long black tentacles. It seems to be a species that prefers a tropical climate, but does breed in N.S.W. It has a lifespan of eleven to thirteen weeks.” A new species for the Conservation Area. This butterfly is famous for its striking pupa, click reference below for more images.

I.D. and text reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference –http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/nymp/core.html

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