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Butterfly

Butterfly and descriptions for Sportsman Creek Conservation Area

Male Orchard or Citrus Butterfly which usually feed on RUTACEAE family of plants. The caterpillars undergo four instar stages before entering pupa stage. The pupa resembles a leaf and metamorphosis can take up to six months.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further Reference: http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/papi/aegeus.html

 

 

Image taken by visiting Wildlife Photographer Tony Belton in the riparan zone at Sportsman Creek of a perfectly camouflaged Evening Brown Butterfly.

Evening Brown Butterfly

The newly published book “Bush Companion Fauna Species of the Clarence Valley and Northern Rivers, New South Wales” is available to purchase direct from the publisher.

This book contains over 310 “full colour plate” fauna species in 250 “perfect bound” pages with both common and scientific names.

Order by email at urimbirra7@gmail.com to reserve your copy.

Price $25 a copy plus postage from Sportsman Creek Press.

Bush Companion Cover

This year we witnessed these beautiful Blue Tiger Butterfly for the first time flying fast in great numbers to the south/west. Apparently they migrate from as far away as North Queensland and we watched their progress from the coast right up into the mountains of Tenterfield so altitudes over twelve hundred metres was not a limiting factor to this migration.

Image courtesy of  Dr. Greg Clancy. 

Blue Tiger Butterlfy Hickey Island Yamba Greg Clancy

“The adults have a wingspan around 7cm. It is famous for its shiny metallic pupa and beautiful caterpillar with eight long black tentacles. It seems to be a species that prefers a tropical climate, but does breed in N.S.W. It has a lifespan of eleven to thirteen weeks.” A new species for the Conservation Area. This butterfly is famous for its striking pupa, click reference below for more images.

I.D. and text reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference –http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/nymp/core.html

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The peer-reviewed  quarterly journal Systematics and Biodiversity recently published the report – Perspectives. Colour and size variation in Junonia villida ( Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae ) : subspecies or phenotypic plasticity ? by R.I. Vane-Wright and W. John Tennant.

The review was based on” examination of c.1500 museum specimens from its entire geographical range from the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean to the Gambiers in mid-Pacific, spanning over 154 degrees of longitude, or 43% of the circumference of the Earth. Mostly found in open grasslands or disturbed areas, including woodlands and disturbed forests from sea-level up to 1500m or more in elevation, it is variable in wing colour pattern on both upper and lower surfaces. The causes of this variability are uncertain, but temperature, photoperiod, rainfall, migration and perhaps underlying geographical differentiation may all play a role.”

The Clarence Valley Meadow Argus butterfly is represented by the image on lower right side taken on the Conservation Area for the cover illustration showing six Australian butterfly with various differences in colour pattern.

Further reference available; http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/tsab20/current  

Authorization and Publisher: Taylor & Francis U.K.

“Common Brown occur across the southern half of Australia, the meropes in Southern Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. The caterpillars hide by day at the base of their host plant, emerging at night to feed on various grass species (POACEAE) on the wildlife refuge.

I.D. and References courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further Reference; http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/nymph/merope.html

A new sighting for the wildlife refuge. “The adult butterflies have buff coloured wings with wide black edges containing buff spots. The hindwings also have two eyespots, one red and one blue. The underside is similar with narrower and paler black markings. With a wingspan of about 10cm”. First described by Linnaeus in 1758. Images are of the Australian subspecies (sthenelus).

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reading; http:/lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/papi/demol.html.

The grey and mottled headed caterpillar feed nocturnally on various species of Mat-rush (Lomandraceae). Across the wildlife refuge this includes the Spiny-headed, Many-flowered and Riverine Mat-rushes. “Males and females of this species look very similar. They are dark brown with a series of translucent white and yellow patches on each forewing. The hindwings have a central yellow band. Found in Queensland and New South Wales with a wingspan around 3cm”.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reference: http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/hesp/iacchus.html


Usually sighted flying high in the tree canopy. This image taken following heavy rains, with butterfly seeking shelter low down. They have bright colours on the wings as a warning to predators. Caterpillars feed on Mistletoe which is very common across the wildlife refuge.

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