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Moths

Moths and descriptions for Sportsman Creek Conservation Area

The caterpillar is found on Mistletoe and when disturbed curl their heads back. They are a large attractive day flying moth often mistaken for a butterfly. A new species for the Conservation Area.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans follow link for further references.

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/agar/behri.html

Mistletoe Day Moth

The caterpillars feed on Hard Quandong. Wingspan around 5cm. First time sighting of this moth at Sportsmans Creek Conservation Area, with no common name.
I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

This moth has a wingspan up to 2.5cm. The caterpillars are green with a pale line along each side of the back. Tufts on the end of the abdomen are wiggled by the female to disperse a pheromone in order to attract a mate.

I.D. and information by Don Herbison-Evans. Further reference http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/spil/indica.html

“The adult moths have various shades of grey-brown with a wavy pattern of darker markings. Wingspan around 3cm.” They have the ability to dislocate their wings for camouflage effect. A new sighting for the Conservation Area.

I.D. and further reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/geom/cinerea-p.html

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/geom/cinerea-p.html

The Northern Ghost Moth is found in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. With brown wings each forewing have a ragged white arc from base to wingtip. Male moths have a wingspan to 11cm with females up to 16cm. A new sighting for the Conservation Area.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Paul Kay.

Further reference available at http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/hepi/barcas.html

“This species occurs around the world in tropical areas. Adult moths have forewings with a complex pattern of variable colours. The hindwings contain white patches. Pupation occurs in a cocoon covered in debris typically on a tree trunk.” A first time sighting on the Conservation Area. A wingspan about 5cm.

I.D. and reference is courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reference is available at http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/calp/linteola.html

Adult female Diathrausta ocreipennis moth with a wingspan of 10 mm. Found in New South Wales and Queensland. A new species for the Conservation Area with no common name.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison Evans and further reference available at

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/spil/ochreipennis.html

Image of male moth with brown patterned forewings, each with a complex spot near the middle. The female is flightless and her bulbous brown body is covered in pale brown hair.

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/lyma/australis.html

I.D. and further reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans

  

The newly published book “Bush Companion Fauna Species of the Clarence Valley and Northern Rivers, New South Wales” is available to purchase direct from the publisher.

This book contains over 310 “full colour plate” fauna species in 250 “perfect bound” pages with both common and scientific names.

Order by email at urimbirra7@gmail.com to reserve your copy.

Price $25 a copy plus postage from Sportsman Creek Press.

Bush Companion Cover

“The normal resting posture has the hind wings covered. They are revealed if the moth is disturbed as it opens its wings for flight. The moths have a wingspan of up to 7cm. The body is brown and cigar shaped. The forewings are brown and the hindwings are red edged and black.” Found across the entire continent.

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reading; http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/sphi/scrofa.html

Hippotion scrofa Moth

 

 

 

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