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Moths

Moths and descriptions for Sportsman Creek Conservation Area

Image of male moth with brown patterned forewings, each with a complex spot near the middle. The female is flightless and her bulbous brown body is covered in pale brown hair.

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/lyma/australis.html

I.D. and further reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans

  

The newly published book “Bush Companion Fauna Species of the Clarence Valley and Northern Rivers, New South Wales” is available to purchase direct from the publisher.

This book contains over 310 “full colour plate” fauna species in 250 “perfect bound” pages with both common and scientific names.

Order by email at urimbirra7@gmail.com to reserve your copy.

Price $25 a copy plus postage from Sportsman Creek Press.

Bush Companion Cover

“The normal resting posture has the hind wings covered. They are revealed if the moth is disturbed as it opens its wings for flight. The moths have a wingspan of up to 7cm. The body is brown and cigar shaped. The forewings are brown and the hindwings are red edged and black.” Found across the entire continent.

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reading; http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/sphi/scrofa.html

Hippotion scrofa Moth

 

 

 

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/anth/flaves.html”First described by Walker in 1855 . This species of moth feeds on Acacia and pupates in a cocoon under bark or in a crevice. The males and females are very different. The female is larger with dark grey and white wings and an abdomen striped in grey or white. The male has a wingspan of up to 3cm and has orange and cream wings. Found along the east coast of Australia and Tasmania.”   With no common name.

I.D. and further reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans. Mike and Pat Coupar and Stella Crossley.

“Found over much of Australia. Basically green with a lacy white pattern. the adults may be distinguished from those of some species in this genus as the hindwings have a plain curved edge with no scalloping. The caterpillars have spiky extensions to it’s body and looks as if it is clothed in armour.” With no common name and a new species for the Conservation Area. I.D. and reference  courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.  http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/geom/insper.html  

“Adult moth has brown forewings with a dark green sheen, and with a sharply defined broad white border along the edges of the wings. The hindwings are orange, with a black border and black comma in the middle. The moth has a wingspan of about 8cm.” A new sighting for the Conservation Area with the common name Green Fruit-piercing Moth.

I.D. and text reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference – http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/cato/salamin.html

 

Found on Red Ironbark (Euc. fibrosa) in the Conservation Area. Distributed across New South Wales and Victoria. Described in 1990 by Scoble and Edwards. A new sighting with no common name.

I.D. courtesy of  Don Herbison-Evans.

Further reference; http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/chro/virgatus.html 

What is the Difference between Moths and Butterflies?

Although the rules for distinguishing between moths and butterflies are not hard and fast, one very good guiding principle is that butterflies have thin antennae and (with one exception) have small balls or clubs at the end of each antennae. Moth antennae can be quite varied in appearance, but in particular lack the club end. The divisions are named by this principle “club antennae” (Rhopalocera) or “varied antennae” (Heterocera).


“The adult moths are stout and brown with a white spot in the middle of each forewing. The female is larger than the male at 3.5cm. Eggs are laid in a jumbled mass on a twig”. ( No common name ).

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference – http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/lasi/alphaea.html  

” This moth occurs over much of Australia. The adult moth has freckly brown forewings each with three orange and two white spots near the middle. The hindwings and abdomen are brown and the thorax is off-white and hairy”. The caterpillars are extraordinarily camoflaged  in the shape of their host tree the eucalypt gum species. First described by Hering in 1931. Click hyperlink below for amazing caterpillar images.

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference – http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/lima/transvestita.html 

“Adult moths have fawn forewings with a dark brown line across each one and  have a dark brown dot near the base of the inner margin. The hindwings are orange with a submarginal arc of dark brown dots, a dark brown patch at the base and a dark brown line across each wing. Underneath each forewing has a purple blotch.”  The caterpillars are looper type and are known to feed on Gum trees. A new find on the Conservation Area. Found in New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia.       

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans and Stella Crossley.

Further reference; http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/chro/henric.html  Beautiful Leaf Moth

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