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Migratory Birds

Migratory breeding birds found on Sportsman Creek Conservation Area

“Hunts from exposed perches; dives to ground to take prey; quite conspicuous in breeding season”. A pair nested near the top dam this spring and could be heard clearly with a piercing “kik-kik-kik-kikkikkik”. They were bold enough to pounce on my swatted March Flies.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.   Field Guide to Australian Birds.

” Migratory, large flocks move north in autumn following the Great Divide and coast-winter in northern N.S.W and S.E. Qld, return to breed in southern forests in spring. Status; common.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.   Field Guide to Australian Birds.

“Hunts from a perch; waits patiently, drops to take insects from ground, foliage. Common across wildlife refuge; partly locally migratory”. Found perched in an Ironbark tree.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.   Field Guide to Australian Birds.

“A summer migrant from Cape York. May be solitary or in pairs, chasing insects, ripping into bark for spiders, beetles and other small prey. Found along the riparian zone on Sportsman Creek.

Reference; Morcombe, M.   Field Guide to Australian Birds.

A spring/summer resident along the riparian zone on Sportsman Creek wildlife refuge. Bird is very hard to detect when perched as it hunts for fish or yabbies.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.  Field Guide to Australian Birds.

“Australia’s only representative of the Roller family; a regular breeding migrant to Australia, wintering on northern islands. Hunts from high bare limbs in the very early morning and twilight. Takes all prey in flight including cicada and beetles.” Three pair are nesting on Sportsman Creek wildlife refuge today.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.  Field Guide to Australian Birds.

A migratory species which breeds in Australia in spring and summer before migrating to New Guinea and Indonesia in winter. The largest of all parasitic birds, 58-65 cm. Two pair are currently at Sportsman Creek wildlife refuge searching for a large host, possibly nesting Torresian Crows.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.  Field Guide to Australian Birds.

An uncommon summer migrant which breeds at Sportsman Creek wildlife refuge. “Insects are taken in the air, from foliage and on the ground. From mid spring to early summer these trillers dominate bush sounds with almost incessant loud trilling”. Image is of a male bird.

Reference;  Morcombe, M.  Field Guide to Australian Birds.

Migratory resident breeding in the Open  dry schlerophyl forest at Sportsman Creek wildlife refuge. “Hunts on dry land for small reptiles and large insects, also uses the margins of wetlands. Attracts attention with persistent calling- “kek-kek-kek” in breeding season”.

Reference; Moorcombe, M.  Field Guide to Australian Birds.

Unlike any other Australian bird, with long outcurved , forked tail, iridescent black plumage and upright posture. These birds are a summer migrant from Cape York and breed at Sportsman Creek wildlife refuge. The bird seen here is feasting on a large Stick Insect.

Reference.  Morcombe, M. Field Guide to Australian Birds.

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