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“The adult moths have a wingspan up to 10 cm. The moth sometimes adopts an asymetrical posture, with the abdomen bent under the wings. Caterpillars are large reddish brown covered in dense bristles which may cause severe irritation if handled.”

I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans  further information is available at

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/anth/chalepteryx.html

Curious as to how the pupa managed to colour itself with these striking markings I asked Lepidoptera expert Don Herbison-Evans for the answer.

“The Glasswing pupa is naked, devoid of any silk except for the cremaster. Its colours are an exaggeration of those of the last larval instar: yellow spiracles ringed by black joined by a lateral black line.”

A miracle of evolution.

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Attractive red robin which is locally migratory. A first time sighting in the Conservation Area.

With no common name and wingspan around 4cm this moth has a dark line on the hindwings and recurved forewings. Caterpillars found feeding in Ironbark trees and tend to pupate in dry soil under suitable conditions.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans with further reference available at

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/chro/punctunculus.html

Extremely widespread across rural districts usually seen performing acrobatics hunting insects.

Breeding pair of Rufous Whistler in the Wildlife Refuge favouring the Melaleuca cover under eucalypts.

The caterpillar is found on Mistletoe and when disturbed curl their heads back. They are a large attractive day flying moth often mistaken for a butterfly. A new species for the Conservation Area.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans follow link for further references.

http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/agar/behri.html

Mistletoe Day Moth

Captured with our Trail camera is this female Painted Button Quail. A bird which feeds both day and night for seeds and insects and is reasonably common and widespread. A new species for the Conservation Area.

I.D. courtesy of D. Eggins.

The locally nomadic Red-browed Finch found feeding on fresh grass seed in the Conservation Area.

The caterpillars feed on Hard Quandong. Wingspan around 5cm. First time sighting of this moth at Sportsmans Creek Conservation Area, with no common name.
I.D. and reference courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

An exploration into...
By Jeff Keyes

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