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Found hunting in flowering Red Ironbark for lorikeets in the Conservation Area. Although a widespread bird throughout Australia a first time sighting here.

I.D. courtesy of Daryl Eggins and Tony Belton.

Small species with a horizontal pupil. The belly is cream coloured with several brown spots. It can be grey, brown or sandy gold black in colour with warty skin. Without webbed feet. Common species and new find in the Conservation Area.

Image Frogs ID. Australian Museum courtesy of Stephen Mahony.

With a shade of green or olive above, yellow belly and long narrow head these snakes are harmless feeding mainly on frogs. Grows to around 1.2 metres.

An Endoxyla species possibly either E. encalypti (Wattle Goat Moth) or E. leucomochla (Wijuti Grub Moth.) The larval species dig under ground or bore into trees and feed on the sap and roots. As adults they have no mouth parts and live on the stored fats. Adult moths have a large wingspan up to 16cm. E. encalypti species are found along the entire East Coast and considered an Endangered species. E. leucomochla feed specifically on Acacia species. A first time sighting on the Conservation Area.

I.D. courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans further reference available at http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/coss/cossidae.html

The caterpillar of the Orchard or Citrus Swallowtail Butterfly which grows into one of the largest butterflies found in suburban gardens.

“What a delightful and charming book! I sometimes have a fantasy that I am going to make a proper investigative census of what lives and visits my own garden here, but I have never got around to it, partly out of idleness and partly because I know I shall discover the shaming dimensions of my own ignorance. Of course I have precious few mammals and reptiles (what I wouldn’t give for an occasional echidna) but the invertebrates I’m sure are much more numerous than I know and would give me a horrible headache. Please congratulate the authors I hope the edition sells out within days.”

To reserve your copy email urimbirra7@gmail.com

Adults are known to be fruit piercing moths. Other species in S.E. Asia are known as Vampire moths and feed on the blood of mammals and vertebrates.

Further reference is available at http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/calp/minuticornis.html courtesy of Don Herbison-Evans.

Harmless orb-weaving spider which is nocturnal weaving a cart-wheel web at night which is consumed in the morning.

A healthy population exists of these secretive carnivorous marsupials in the Conservation Area. Image from Trail Camera.

Found feeding on Spotted gum tree for wood boring grubs.

An exploration into...
By Jeff Keyes

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